Hearing Loops in the News – Nichols Hills City Hall

Assist2Hear was featured recently in the Oklahoma City Oklahoman newspaper. The Oklahoman visited with Ana Covey, a partner in the Assist2Hear Oklahoma office, about the induction loop installation  at the Nichols Hills City Hall, located at 6407 Avondale Dr. in downtown Nichols Hills. The Nichols Hills hearing loop was installed last summer during the Nichols Hills City Hall renovation project. The hearing loop was the first local installation by Oklahoma City Assist2Hear crew members Ana Covey and Parry Hardy – who were incredibly excited to be able to bring induction loop technology to their home turf of Oklahoma City!

 

In her Oklahoman interview, Ana got the chance to share some of the common misconceptions about the needs of persons living with hearing loss in the Oklahoma community.

 

A common misconception is that increasing the sound system volume in a public place, such as an auditorium, church or public meeting area, will enable someone with hearing loss to hear better……with hearing aids everything is louder, including background noise. Volume is not the issue; it is the lack of clarity that is actually the culprit

shared Ana with Oklahoma readers.

 

To enjoy the Oklahoman article about the Nichols Hills hearing loop system and Assist2Hear in its entirety, checkout Hearing-impaired gain clear access in Nichols Hills.

 

For more information, Central Oklahoma Chapter of the Hearing Loss Association of America, 717-9820 or go to www.hearingloss.org.

Assist2Hear, a designer and installer of professional hearing loops systems in public venues throughout the United States, Ana Covey at 640-5152, via email acovey@assist2hear.com or go to www.Assist2Hear.com.

And the Next Hearing Loop Location is…the Round Rock City Council Chambers

Round Rock citizens be sure and get your telecoils activated because the Round Rock City Council Chambers, located at 221 E. Main Street in downtown Round Rock, will the newest location in Texas to install an induction hearing loop system!    In early January, the City of Round Rock Facilities team will begin pulling carpet tiles to allow for the hearing loop wiring to be ran.  The wire will then be connected to the Round Rock City Council’s audio system.    Round Rock City Council meeting attendees will be able to hear Round Rock council members’ voices as clearly as if their local representative was talking right into their ear!

Assist2Hear wants to give a sincere thank you on behalf of persons with hearing loss to the City of Round Rock, the Round Rock City Council, and the local Round Rock Sertoma Club, as each party worked together to make the hearing loop install a reality for Round Rock citizens!

Tulsa Induction Loop Training at Church of Saint Mary, 8/20/17

Catholic Church of Saint Mary
Ana at the Catholic Church of Saint Mary during the hearing loop installation.

Tulsa Induction Loop Training

On Sunday, August 20th at 9:30 a.m., Ana Covey with Assist2Hear will be at at the beautiful Catholic Church of Saint Mary, 1347 E. 49th Place, Tulsa, Oklahoma, to host an induction loop training session to help parishioners learn to use the church’s new hearing  loop system.  Tulsans please join us if you have hearing loss and would like to learn more how induction loop systems can help you better hear the Word!   Click here to view event information.

 

Hearing Loops in Churches

Assist2Hear specializes in the design and installation of induction hearing loop systems in churches, performing arts centers, classrooms, and public meeting places such as your local library or city council chambers.  To get a free quote for a hearing loop system in your church or just learn more about hearing assistive technology in general, contact Assist2Hear today at info@assist2hear.com.

 

 

Are you in DENIAL about Hearing Loss?

Denial about Hearing Loss is very common!

Are you struggling to hear clearly? Do you find yourself asking people to repeat themselves because you believe they are mumbling?  Is it difficult to hear in a restaurant or riding in a car? Are you struggling to hear the sermon at church or a speaker during a presentation?  Many of us are missing out on important parts of a conversation, constantly trying to fill in the blanks.  Are you in denial about hearing loss?

Many of us are in a state of denial about our hearing loss and it is very common.  Most hearing loss is very gradual so it can go unnoticed for a long time.  We miss the clues and deny the facts.  We can’t see or feel hearing loss.  Yet, hearing is one of our most important senses.   It keeps us connected socially – or not.  It is important to our employment, yet we are afraid to say anything for fear of retribution or loss of a job.  It is important to our safety and well-being to hear sirens, horns or impending danger.

When did eye glasses become ok but not hearing aids?  We’ll spend several thousand dollars to have our eyes fixed with a laser, but we are reluctant to spend the same to improve our hearing.  The bad part about denial of your hearing loss is that your brain actually forgets the sounds you used to hear and now do not.  The longer this goes on, the harder it is for the brain to relearn these sounds when you are finally fit with a hearing aid.  Relate this to your brain adjusting to new bi-focals or tri-focals in your glasses or contacts.  It can be unnerving and actually painful when sounds are brought back into your life until the brain adjusts.  Some people quit using their hearing aids for this reason!  Sure, hearing aids are not perfect and do not “cure” hearing loss any more than glasses cure vision loss, but they are a step toward maintaining quality of life.

With the Baby Boomers making up about 1/3 of the hard of hearing population in the US, hearing loss is becoming more common in conversation.  Access for the hard of hearing in many private and public venues is becoming an issue.  New revised ADA standards effective 3/15/12 clearly mandate that all public venues of any size with a sound system must provide assistive listening devices.  Hearing loops are the favored system by many and loops are becoming more common in the US.  Grass roots initiatives are gaining ground in many states including Colorado, Oklahoma, Kansas, Texas, Michigan, Wisconsin, New York, Florida, New Mexico and Arizona.

Advocacy for hearing access is on the rise after being shoved under the carpet for many years.  We at Assist2Hear are trying to do our part in promoting access for the hard of hearing and educating the public and hearing professionals about what is available to help the hard of hearing, most notably induction hearing loops.

Are you ready to acknowledge your hearing loss and do something about it?  Please visit your local audiologist for a hearing screening and make sure to bring a friend or family member to check theirs as well!

Caring for Your Hearing Aid

Caring for your hearing aid is a must! Take care of your investment with these simple tips.

Caring for your hearing aid is essential.  Like your car or your home, your hearing aid is an investment and a vital one at that.  If you want to make your hearing aid last longer, consider these tips:

 

1. Did you know that moisture is the # 1 cause for hearing aid failure? Clean and disinfect your hearing aids regularly, but not with water. Spray your hearing aid with a disinfectant/deodorizer that is made especially for hearing aids (including ear molds), then wipe them down with a soft, dry cloth.  You can also use hearing aid cleaning wipes, which are pre-moistened.  In addition to products that you can use at home, you can also purchase travel-size (2 oz. or 4 oz) bottles of hearing aid spray cleaner or travel-size maintenance kits with battery testers.

 

2. Remove any ear wax in and around the plastic tubing with a hearing aid brush. Wax can block the receiver or microphone and reduce sound, cause feedback or create a whistling effect. Although many hearing aid kits come with a wire pick, be careful when using them as they can force the wax deeper into the channel.

 

3. Open the battery door when storing your hearing aid to let the air enter. This will reduce the effects of moisture and helps prolong battery life. Better yet, use a hearing aid dryer.  Some hearing aid dryers use gentle heat to remove moisture and condensation.  Some use UV light instead of chemicals, to inhibit bacteria growth.   Others, like the Ever-Dry Hearing Aid Dryer, use highly absorbent silica gel beads to pull the moisture from the hearing aid and any wax.  They’re simple to use and the compartment is easy to open (even for those with arthritis).  Most, like the Serene Innovations Hearing Aid Dryer, will hold two pairs of hearing aids or cochlear implant processors.  There’s even a built-in battery tester and an AC adapter so you can take the hearing aid dryer when you travel.

 

4. Keep your hearing aids in their dryer or case when not in use. Don’t store your hearing aid in direct heat or sunlight, which will damage them.

 

Maintaining your hearing aid can save you a lot of money in the long run.  Hearing aid care is surely a “sound” investment in your future!

 

To learn more about hearing aids and Hearing Loops, visit https://assist2hear.com/treatments-and-devices/

arrow_upward